2nd Festival of German cinema in London ends with success - GLOOMY SUNDAY enthralls premiere audience

The biggest festival of German cinema to be organised by the Export-Union this year wrapped last week: it presented a total of 20 new German films and the programme of shorts entitled "Next Generation" from 2-9 December in collaboration with the Goethe-Institut in London, the Federal State Minister for Culture and Affairs of the Media, the FFA and the six major regional film funds.

 

The selection of films, made as always by an expert jury of the host country, was presented for the first time within thematic strands:

"New German Films":

GLOOMY SUNDAY by Rolf Schuebel (opening film),
FEUERREITER by Nina Grosse (closing film);
AIMÉE & JAGUAR by Max Faerberboeck,
APRIL CHILDREN (APRILKINDER) by Yueksel Yavuz,
GREEN DESERT (GRUENE WUESTE) by Anno Saul,
AFTER THE TRUTH (NICHTS ALS DIE WAHRHEIT) by Roland Suso Richter, and
ANNALUISE & ANTON (PUENKTCHEN & ANTON) by Caroline Link;

 

"Berlin Berlin" with

DEALER by Thomas Arslan,
LOLA & BILIDIKID by Kutlug Ataman,
PLUSMINUS NULL by Eoin Moore and
PATHS IN THE NIGHT (WEGE IN DIE NACHT) by Andreas Kleinert;

 

"Focus on Andreas Dresen" with

STILLES LAND (1992),
RAUS AUS DER HAUT (1997) and
NIGHTSHAPES (NACHTGESTALTEN, 1999);

 

"Zeitgeist", a programme of documentaries conceived by Goethe-Institut London with

DIE BLUME DER HAUSFRAU by Dominik Wessely,
BRIGITTE UND MARCEL - GOLZOWER LEBENSWEGE by Barbara and Winfried Junge,
HERR ZWILLING UND FRAU ZUCKERMANN by Volker Koepp,
DAS MEISTERSPIEL by Lutz Dammberg,
MEMORY OF BERLIN by John Burgan
VERRUECKT BLEIBEN, VERLIEBT BLEIBEN by Elfi Mikesch.

The programme also included "Next Generation", a selection of 13 current shorts by German film students, which was compiled on the initiative of the Export-Union. As in the previous year, the festival was held in the Metro Cinema, one of the best-known venues for independent cinema in London. Most of the directors attended the screenings of their films in person and were visibly impressed by the great interest shown by the spectators of a country which is generally regarded as "difficult territory" for German films.

"I am delighted that our film was so well received by both the invited premiere guests as well as the ordinary London public", enthused Rolf Schuebel. "I was very moved to see how

GLOOMY SUNDAY